Surf, a sport that continues to go beyond the waves of the sea

By
AIDA AYUSO SEGADO
12 · 27 · 2018

That's right, many of those who practice it, talk about this sport as a way to connect with nature. The great majority have acknowledged that link once.

It is true that it is not the most widespread sport, or perhaps the most accessible, and even today, millions of people admit that they have never tried to surf a wave.

Although it is a sport that was born in the sea, sometimes it has been tried to move from there. Proof of this are the first artificial wave pools that go back to the 19th century, when a lake was electrified to generate waves.

The initial basis for the appearance of these was the ability to transmit on television the events, whose sponsors were the main stakeholders in which they were held, since their absolute dependence on weather conditions prevented them from setting a schedule for their retransmission.

This may be a clear example of that impulse that moves us to want to imitate nature continuously, or even pretend to overcome it.

But the possibility of practicing your favorite sport without having to depend on the optimal conditions are given attracts anyone. On the other hand, many of the lovers of this sport defend that surfing in a pool of artificial waves is neither more nor less than a "betrayal" to the sea.

That feeling of not knowing when the next wave will be, even if you will take one again that day, or spend hours trying to read the sea and learn to anticipate its continuous changes. It is something incomparable.

That said, artificial wave pools are still news today. A revolutionary technology to generate artificial waves, radically different from those known so far, comes with the opening of Surf Lakes in the vicinity of Queensland, Australia.

The managers, Surf Lakes Holdings Ltd, an Australian company, are developing a new wave generation technology based on concentric waves. Producing a variety of waves that closely mimic the natural waves of the ocean, using a lower energy cost per wave compared to other technologies.

The goal of Surf Lakes is to bring surfing to the masses around the world. The wave pool is supported by a giant plunger at its center, of 1400 tons, which generates a pulse every six seconds to send water waving in all directions.

The angle of the bottom of the lake does the rest, causing it to break the more or less "dry" wave. Up to 240 surfers per hour of different skills can enjoy the experience, avoiding the need to run separate sessions for new pilots and experienced ones.

It is assumed, therefore, that the aforementioned pools will never replace the ocean for some. Although for many others it is an advance, that after a period of adaptation and if these continue, fortunately or unfortunately, it will allow a new generation of surfers who will have the possibility of surfing without ever having seen the sea.

On the other hand "5 wakes" Surf Lakes, is a project endorsed by surfers of the stature of Barton Lynch, winner of the ASP World Tour title, and currently known as one of the best surfing coaches in the world, and expert commentator on major events, and Mark Occhillupo, ambassador of his own brand, surfer since he was 9 years old, world champion in 1999 and in the world top 16, currently.

With this we must say that it is not a point of inflection in surfing, and that there are veteran surfers who support the concept of artificial pool, and new athletes who defend the link with the sea over any technological advance.

Surfing is an exciting sport, whose popularity is growing all over the world. However, its accessibility is still limited, so less than 1% of the world's population has tried surfing.

"5 wakes" Surf Lakes would allow fans of this sport to do so much more than they do now, and would leave without excuses those who have not yet tried it, since it generates waves of all heights, and levels of difficulty, these are differentiated by colors so that beginner surfers and advanced wave surfers can make the most of their experience.

 

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